Ukrainian Settlements in Saskatchewan – Lecture by Alan Anderson

Students, faculty, and the public are invited to attend an upcoming lecture from PCUH Research Affiliate Dr. Alan Anderson, titled “Where have all the people gone?”.

Join us in Room 1001, St. Thomas More College, on Tuesday November 19th at 4:00 pm.

Dr. Anderson will speak on the topic of vanishing Ukrainian Canadian communities in Saskatchewan, and how the depopulation of ethnic bloc settlements has affected the provincial demographic landscape.

Opening reception for Behind the Wire

On November 5th, a wine and cheese reception was held in the Shannon Library of St. Thomas More College to welcome and hear from Dr. Stefan Manz, Professor of German and Global History and Head of Languages and Translation Studies at Aston University (Birmingham, UK).

Dr. Manz was on hand to officially open Behind the Wire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1919, a traveling exhibit organized by Aston University and Edinburgh Napier University (Edinburgh, Scotland), in partnership with Archaeology Scotland and the Internment Research Centre, Hawick Museum (Hawick, Scotland). The exhibit is hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH), in association with the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

Dr. Manz discussed how the First World War was not only truly global in scope, but was a war fought between empires and, as such, subjects of those empires who lived and worked abroad found themselves labeled ‘enemy aliens’ and a danger to the internal security of nations. The British Empire interned a total of ~50,000 individuals over the course of the war and afterward. In Canada, 24 internment camps existed from 1914 to 1920.

The display marks the centenary end of the Great War, and is scheduled to run from October 28th December 15th in the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

PCUH represented at Harvard conference

To share the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage’s research on transnational family correspondence and personal sources archiving among Ukrainians in Canada, PCUH Director Dr. Natalia Khanenko-Friesen recently participated in the 2019 Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Khanenko-Friesen’s report on PCUH’s Ukrainian Transnational Correspondence archives was warmly received by those in attendance.

The event gathered North America’s leading Ukrainian archivists, with insightful discussion around present and future practices in curation and engaged scholarship. More information about the Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium can be found at http://www.uhcna.org/.

Traveling exhibit wine & cheese reception

Exhibit examines First World War internment as a global phenomenon

On Tuesday November 5th, at 7:00 pm, a wine and cheese reception will take place in the Shannon Library (St. Thomas More College). All are invited to attend to hear from Dr. Stefan Manz, Professor of German and Global History and Head of Languages and Translation Studies, Aston University (Birmingham, UK). He is the author of Constructing a German Diaspora: The “Greater German Empire,” 1871-1914 (2014) and more recently co-editor of Internment during the First World War: A Mass Global Phenomenon (2019).

This reception will officially open Behind the Wire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1919, a traveling exhibit organized by Aston University and Edinburgh Napier University (Edinburgh, Scotland), in partnership with Archaeology Scotland and the Internment Research Centre, Hawick Museum (Hawick, Scotland). The exhibit is hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH), in association with the St. Thomas More Art Gallery. The display marks the centenary end of the Great War and is scheduled to run from October 28 – December 15 in the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.