Ukrainian-Canadian Identity through Five Generations

PCUH Research Affiliate Dr. Alan Anderson presents his research on the ever-changing Ukrainian culture and identities of the Canadian Prairies

On March 10, the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage at St. Thomas More College was pleased to welcome Professor Emeritus Dr. Alan Anderson to present his lecture, entitled Generations: How Ukrainian-Canadian Identity and Culture are Changing through Five Generations.

Drawing from both his decades of research and from Statistics Canada data, Dr. Anderson provided listeners with compelling insights into how Ukrainian-Canadian identity has evolved over the 20th and 21st centuries.

Dr. Anderson speaking on the topic of diasporic Ukrainian and Ukrainian-Canadian ethnocultural identities

Upcoming Lecture with Dr. Alan Anderson

On Tuesday, March 10th at 4:00 pm, Professor Emeritus Dr. Alan Anderson will be presenting his second lecture on the topic of Ukrainian-Canadian ethnic identity in the Prairie provinces.

Building upon his decades of research, Dr. Anderson will discuss the ongoing sociocultural changes taking place in traditionally-identified Ukrainian-Canadian communities.

Students, faculty, and the general public are invited to join us for this free lecture.

St. Thomas More College is fully accessible for those with mobility issues.

Ukrainian Studies Roundtable

On the evening of Wednesday, February 26th, the University of Saskatchewan Ukrainian Students Association (USUSA) hosted a roundtable discussion about the current and future state of Ukrainian studies on the U of S campus.

At this event, USUSA executive members, past and current USask students, and community leaders spoke about their experiences within the Ukrainian Minor program and within the city of Saskatoon’s wider Ukrainian-Canadian community.

Those who shared their thoughts included:

Connor Moen — a former student of the Spring Session in Ukraine (SSU) program and former USUSA president — who now works on Parliament Hill and joined via Skype; Nykola Dovgyy, the current USUSA president; Tiana Kirstein, VP Internal for USUSA and a former student of the Spring Session in Ukraine program; Oliver Childs, a former student of the Spring Session in Ukraine program and a former USUSA member (representing students of non-Ukrainian heritage); and Nykole King, a former student of the Spring Session in Ukraine program and the current Editor-in-Chief of the Sheaf, the University of Saskatchewan’s student weekly.

2020 Mohyla Lecture a success

Dr. Dominique Arel’s talk brings the Donbas Conflict to the forefront at STM

On February 13th, the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage was pleased to welcome the University of Ottawa’s Dr. Dominique Arel to St. Thomas More College. Dr. Arel was the Mohyla lecturer for 2020, presenting on The Origins and Consequences of the Donbas War.

Speaking in STM’s Shannon Library, Dr. Arel touched upon both the roots of the conflict within the 2014 Euromaidan movement, and the continuing influence of the Russian government in stoking misinformation and contention.

PCUH to host 23rd annual Mohyla Lecture

Dr. Dominique Arel will speak on The Origins and Consequences of the Donbas War

The Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage at St. Thomas More College is pleased to announce the speaker for the 23rd annual Mohyla Lecture.

Dr. Dominique Arel, Associate Professor of Political Science and Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Ottawa, will discuss the ongoing armed conflict in Eastern Ukraine.

Members of the University of Saskatchewan community, as well as the interested public, are invited to attend. The Mohyla Lecture will take place Thursday, February 13th, 7:00 pm, in the Shannon Library at St. Thomas More College.

The lecture is free to attend, with a reception to follow directly afterward.

Holodomor Awareness Week

During the week of November 24-30, the University of Saskatchewan Ukrainian Students’ Association (USUSA) will be promoting Holodomor Awareness Week, honouring the millions of Ukrainians that perished under Soviet rule in the 1932-1933 famine-genocide.

Those who may be on campus during this time should be on the lookout for wheat bundles, placed in areas by members of the USUSA, with information related to the Holodomor.

A vigil to commemorate the victims of the Holodomor will be held in the St. Thomas More College Chapel on Thursday, November 28, at 12:30 PM. Students, staff, and members of the public are all encouraged to attend.

PCUH hosts lecture with Dr. Alan Anderson

On November 19th, the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH) was pleased to host Dr. Alan Anderson, lecturing on the topic “Where have all the people gone?” – The depopulation of Ukrainian communities and settlements in Saskatchewan.

Dr. Anderson spoke of the many vanishing Ukrainian Canadian communities in Saskatchewan, and how the depopulation of historic ethnic bloc settlements has affected the provincial demographic landscape.

Using both his personal research as a sociologist as well as historic and current Canadian census data, Dr. Anderson raised many compelling questions about the causes of what he has termed “delocalisation”, and whether or not this change in or loss of community has influenced ethnic identities.

Ukrainian Settlements in Saskatchewan – Lecture by Alan Anderson

Students, faculty, and the public are invited to attend an upcoming lecture from PCUH Research Affiliate Dr. Alan Anderson, titled “Where have all the people gone?”.

Join us in Room 1001, St. Thomas More College, on Tuesday November 19th at 4:00 pm.

Dr. Anderson will speak on the topic of vanishing Ukrainian Canadian communities in Saskatchewan, and how the depopulation of ethnic bloc settlements has affected the provincial demographic landscape.

Opening reception for Behind the Wire

On November 5th, a wine and cheese reception was held in the Shannon Library of St. Thomas More College to welcome and hear from Dr. Stefan Manz, Professor of German and Global History and Head of Languages and Translation Studies at Aston University (Birmingham, UK).

Dr. Manz was on hand to officially open Behind the Wire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1919, a traveling exhibit organized by Aston University and Edinburgh Napier University (Edinburgh, Scotland), in partnership with Archaeology Scotland and the Internment Research Centre, Hawick Museum (Hawick, Scotland). The exhibit is hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH), in association with the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

Dr. Manz discussed how the First World War was not only truly global in scope, but was a war fought between empires and, as such, subjects of those empires who lived and worked abroad found themselves labeled ‘enemy aliens’ and a danger to the internal security of nations. The British Empire interned a total of ~50,000 individuals over the course of the war and afterward. In Canada, 24 internment camps existed from 1914 to 1920.

The display marks the centenary end of the Great War, and is scheduled to run from October 28th December 15th in the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

PCUH represented at Harvard conference

To share the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage’s research on transnational family correspondence and personal sources archiving among Ukrainians in Canada, PCUH Director Dr. Natalia Khanenko-Friesen recently participated in the 2019 Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Khanenko-Friesen’s report on PCUH’s Ukrainian Transnational Correspondence archives was warmly received by those in attendance.

The event gathered North America’s leading Ukrainian archivists, with insightful discussion around present and future practices in curation and engaged scholarship. More information about the Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium can be found at http://www.uhcna.org/.