Ukrainian Settlements in Saskatchewan – Lecture by Alan Anderson

Students, faculty, and the public are invited to attend an upcoming lecture from PCUH Research Affiliate Dr. Alan Anderson, titled “Where have all the people gone?”.

Join us in Room 1001, St. Thomas More College, on Tuesday November 19th at 4:00 pm.

Dr. Anderson will speak on the topic of vanishing Ukrainian Canadian communities in Saskatchewan, and how the depopulation of ethnic bloc settlements has affected the provincial demographic landscape.

Opening reception for Behind the Wire

On November 5th, a wine and cheese reception was held in the Shannon Library of St. Thomas More College to welcome and hear from Dr. Stefan Manz, Professor of German and Global History and Head of Languages and Translation Studies at Aston University (Birmingham, UK).

Dr. Manz was on hand to officially open Behind the Wire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1919, a traveling exhibit organized by Aston University and Edinburgh Napier University (Edinburgh, Scotland), in partnership with Archaeology Scotland and the Internment Research Centre, Hawick Museum (Hawick, Scotland). The exhibit is hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH), in association with the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

Dr. Manz discussed how the First World War was not only truly global in scope, but was a war fought between empires and, as such, subjects of those empires who lived and worked abroad found themselves labeled ‘enemy aliens’ and a danger to the internal security of nations. The British Empire interned a total of ~50,000 individuals over the course of the war and afterward. In Canada, 24 internment camps existed from 1914 to 1920.

The display marks the centenary end of the Great War, and is scheduled to run from October 28th December 15th in the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

PCUH represented at Harvard conference

To share the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage’s research on transnational family correspondence and personal sources archiving among Ukrainians in Canada, PCUH Director Dr. Natalia Khanenko-Friesen recently participated in the 2019 Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Khanenko-Friesen’s report on PCUH’s Ukrainian Transnational Correspondence archives was warmly received by those in attendance.

The event gathered North America’s leading Ukrainian archivists, with insightful discussion around present and future practices in curation and engaged scholarship. More information about the Ukrainian Heritage North American Consortium can be found at http://www.uhcna.org/.

Traveling exhibit wine & cheese reception

Exhibit examines First World War internment as a global phenomenon

On Tuesday November 5th, at 7:00 pm, a wine and cheese reception will take place in the Shannon Library (St. Thomas More College). All are invited to attend to hear from Dr. Stefan Manz, Professor of German and Global History and Head of Languages and Translation Studies, Aston University (Birmingham, UK). He is the author of Constructing a German Diaspora: The “Greater German Empire,” 1871-1914 (2014) and more recently co-editor of Internment during the First World War: A Mass Global Phenomenon (2019).

This reception will officially open Behind the Wire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire, 1914-1919, a traveling exhibit organized by Aston University and Edinburgh Napier University (Edinburgh, Scotland), in partnership with Archaeology Scotland and the Internment Research Centre, Hawick Museum (Hawick, Scotland). The exhibit is hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH), in association with the St. Thomas More Art Gallery. The display marks the centenary end of the Great War and is scheduled to run from October 28 – December 15 in the St. Thomas More Art Gallery.

Dr. Alan Anderson renewed as PCUH Research Affiliate

The University of Saskatchewan Professor Emeritus of Sociology has served as a Research Affiliate of PCUH since 2016.

The Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH) is pleased to share that the Dean’s Office of St. Thomas More College has renewed Dr. Alan Anderson’s term as a PCUH Research Affiliate. Since receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Saskatchewan in 1972, Dr. Anderson has devoted himself to researching and writing on the province’s ethnic settlements.

More recently, Dr. Anderson authored the section on Ethnic Bloc Settlements,1850s-1990s, in the Atlas of Saskatchewan (2000), he was a contributing editor for ethnic settlements and demography in the Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan (2005), and he was the author of Settling Saskatchewan (2013).

He has been guest editor of recent special issues of the Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe, respectively on “Minority Rights and the New Migration” (Volume 16 Issue 2, 2017) and “Separatist Movements in Europe” (Volume 17 Issue 3, 2018); the latter issue included his review article on A. Matveeva, Through Times of Trouble: Conflict in Southeastern Ukraine Explained from Within.

In addition to his research and writing, Dr. Anderson has served as president of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association and as vice-president of the Central and East European Studies Association of Canada.

New appointment – Chair of Ukrainian Studies Minor Advisory Committee

The Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Nadya Foty-Oneschuk as the Chair of the Ukrainian Studies Minor Advisory Committee at St. Thomas More College.

Dr. Foty-Oneschuk is an instructor of Ukrainian language, a cultural ethnographer, and a folklorist, with an expertise in Ukrainian Canadian folklore. Her research focuses on Ukrainian Canadian culture, with a special interest in ritual, most notably wedding traditions.

In addition to language teaching, Nadya has taught a variety of culture classes throughout her career, including such topics as folk songs, Ukrainian Canadian culture, oral history, and the anthropology of Ukraine. In a forthcoming book review for the Canadian Journal of History, Nadya looks at a recent compendium regarding the cultural history and politics of the Ukrainian language.

Nadya has been a long-term affiliate of PCUH, serving once again in an administrative capacity for the Centre. Dr. Foty-Oneschuk is known for her keen and active involvement with students, for which she has been awarded a University of Saskatchewan Teaching Excellence Award on two occasions. Further, she is proud of her work with the U of S Ukrainian Students’ Association in her capacity as their long-time advisor, which has boasted the largest membership nationally several times. For the last decade, Nadya has worked tirelessly in the promotion of Ukrainian studies on campus and in the local community, and looks forward to a bright and dynamic future for the program. Congratulations to Dr. Foty-Oneschuk!

Lecture & book launch – Kurelek’s The Passion of Christ

On October 26th, the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage(PCUH), in conjunction with St. Thomas More College, St Vladimir Institute (Toronto), and the Les and Irene Dube Chair in Catholic Studies presented the National Book Launch Tour Special Presentation The Passion of Christ by William Kurelek New Edition, by art historian and author Dr. Khrystyna Beregovska of Lviv, Ukraine.

This new book introduces the pinnacle of the religious art created by Ukrainian-Canadian artist William Kurelek. The series “The Passion of Christ” is comprised of 160 paintings illustrating verse-for-verse the “Suffering, Death, and Resurrection” of Christ as described in the Gospel of Matthew. The ecumenical dimension of Kurelek’s work has made him famous the world over.

Dr. Khrystyna Beregovska in the STM Chapel

The book is divided into two parts – text and illustration. The text presents a brief biography, describing the artist’s study and training, discussing the lead-up to the creation of the series, and providing a professional review. The book also includes reviews that discuss the importance and uniqueness of the Passion series, including a commentary by William Kurelek himself. This is the first publication about William Kurelek in Ukraine.

PCUH hosts Ukrainian Studies reception

On October 24th, St. Thomas More College’s Chelsea Commons was host to new and returning University of Saskatchewan students pursuing Ukrainian Studies.

The event provided a chance for students and community members to meet with one another, and for the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH) and St. Thomas More College to extend official welcoming greetings.

Information was shared about STM’s Ukrainian Studies minor, the Spring Session in Ukraine (SSU), the University of Saskatchewan Ukrainian Students’ Association (USUSA), and the ongoing work and projects of PCUH.

PCUH announces appointment of new director

The Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Natalia Khanenko-Friesen as its next director.

  
Dr. Khanenko-Friesen is a professor of anthropology, a cultural ethnographer, and an oral historian with expertise in post-socialist transition, diaspora studies, migration, and community engagement. Her research agenda focuses on Ukrainian Canadian culture, Ukraine, and its new post-socialist diasporas.


Natalia recently returned from her sabbatical year, most of which she spent abroad, including a term at Harvard University. She continued working on her two current projects, oral history of decollectivization in Ukraine and transatlantic letter exchanges between Ukrainians in the diaspora and homeland. Natalia has been a long-term member of PCUH, served as its director previously, and managed the Centre’s research program, “Personal Sources Archives.” 


A founding editor of Canada’s internationally-recognized Engaged Scholar Journal, with the mission to promote community-university collaborative scholarship, she also continues to oversee the Journal’s operations. She says that these two areas — community-engaged scholarship and Ukrainian Studies in Canada — overlap meaningfully and continue to inform her work. 

New book on Canada-Ukraine Relations

McGill-Queen’s University Press, Canada’s foremost academic publisher, recently released a new book by Prof. Bohdan Kordan, Director of the PCUH. The book titled Strategic Friends: Canada-Ukraine Relations from Independence to the Euromaidan examines the continuity and change in Canada’s foreign policy toward Ukraine from the late Soviet period to the Revolution of Dignity. A comparative-historical study that draws on government documents, newspaper accounts and archival sources, the work details and analyzes the Canada-Ukraine relationship across the Mulroney, Chretien, Martin and Harper governments. Of particular interest is the Ukrainian-Canadian community’s role in strengthening the relationship.
The book is part of the PCUH’s Canada-Ukraine Relations Initiative, an ongoing project looking to document the evolving nature of the relationship. Strategic Friends can be purchased online or ordered through your local bookstore.