2017 Ukrainian Studies Minor Graduates

2017 Ukrainian Studies Minor Graduates
l-r: Samara Sawchuk, Ashley Halko-Addley, Christina Rybalka

Ukrainian Studies at the University of Saskatchewan has a long and respected history. In 1944, it was the first institution in North America to offer a Ukrainian language class. It has evolved in keeping with the times, student interests and demand. Currently, Ukrainian Studies is offered as a Minor program at St Thomas More College, which is responsible for its delivery and provisioning.

In 2017, the first cohort of students with a Ukrainian Studies Minor graduated. The students included Samara Sawchuk, Ashley Halko-Addley and Christina Rybalka. Congratulations to the recent graduates. Job well done!

Ukrainian Consulate General Visit to STM and PCUH

Consul Generl of Ukraine, Andrii Veselovskyj and STM Dean, Dr. Kumaran

On June 1, 2017 the Consul General of Ukraine, Mr. Andrii Veslovskyi, visited STM and PCUH. Discussions were held on how the Government of Ukraine could help the exchange of students and faculty members between Ukraine and Canada. Prof. Kordan raised the issue of creating an international umbrella cultural organization funded by Ukraine and Canada along the lines of Germany’s Goethe Institute or the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute to facilitate such exchanges. Dean Arul Kumaran suggested such an institute could serve to invigorate STM’s Spring Session in Ukraine program by introducing bursaries and other forms of support. The Consul General confirmed that the concept was currently under consideration and that he would convey STM’s interest to co-operate in such an endeavour.

No Free Man Receives Jennifer Welsh Award for Scholarly Writing

Prof. Kordan at the 2017 Sask Book Awards

The 24th Annual Saskatchewan Book Awards were held April 29, 2017 at the Conexus Arts Centre in Regina, Saskatchewan. The awards celebrate excellence in writing and publishing. Prof. Bohdan Kordan’s No Free Man: Canada, the Great War, and the Enemy Alien Experience was shortlisted and then selected as the recipient of the Jennifer Welsh Award in Scholarly Writing. The award is presented for the best contribution in book form to scholarly work in a particular area that “build[s] on theoretical work within a community of scholars and contribute[s] to the creation and transmission of knowledge.”

Selected by a jury of distinguished academics, the panel described the book as “a comprehensive and compelling study.” Said to be “engaging” and “well-researched”, the work was cited for its wider significance “as we confront divided loyalties and the cultural impact of immigration both in yesteryear and today.”

New PCUH Affiliate Appointed

Following a successful career with the Ministry of Education, Nadia Prokopchuk was appointed as the English as an Additional Language (EAL) Program Specialist in the Department of Curriculum Studies, College of Education at the University of Saskatchewan. On May 1, 2017 she joins the PCUH as a Faculty Affiliate. After earning both a B. Ed. and M. Ed at the University of Saskatchewan, Ms. Prokopchuk held several administrative roles with Saskatoon Catholic Schools, including assistant to the Director of Education. In 2000, Nadia accepted a position with the Ministry of Education as a provincial languages consultant and later Senior Program Manager for EAL and heritage languages, a position she held until retirement from the ministry in 2016. Nadia’s long-term research interests focus on effective language education, EAL teacher education and use of the Common Framework of Reference (CFR) as a comprehensive language reference tool. Current international projects include an advisory role on the curriculum reform committee of Ukraine’s education ministry and visiting lecturer at Ternopil National Pedagogical University. Nadia is a member of the University of Saskatchewan Senate and the Saskatchewan-Ukraine Relations Advisory Committee.

Searching for letters for PCUH project “Letters from the Old Country”

PCUH is pleased to announce the new round of archival collection of
family letters for its project “Letters
from the Old Country”.

Do you have a collection of old letters from the ‘old country’, and you don’t know what to do with them? Talk to us. We are seeking archival donations of letters from the ‘old country. In 2017, to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary, we are offering free digitization of qualified ‘old country’ letter collections, in exchange for archival donation of digital images. For more information visit the project page.

Dr. Khanenko-Friesen also recently presented this project at the University of Alberta, her talk about family letter exchanges between Ukraine and Canada in the 20th century is available here.

Professor Nadya Foty-Oneschuk Recognized for Teaching Excellence

Each Spring the University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union (USSU) celebrates excellence on the University of Saskatchewan campus through teaching awards and awards for excellence outside the teaching field.  Students from UKR 217 nominated Prof. Nadya Foty-Oneschuk for a USSU Teaching Excellence Award, filling out an evaluation survey. Based on the numerical results of the evaluation, the USSU selected the ten winners for this year’s University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union Teaching Excellence Award, choosing Prof. Foty-Oneschuk as one of the recipients.

Prof. Nadya Foty-Oneschuk, a PCUH Affiliate, is responsible for Ukrainian language instruction at all levels on the University of Saskatchewan campus. The PCUH directly supports Ukrainian language instruction on campus through financial subsidies for Ukrainian language course offerings.

Pre-Screening of ‘Bitter Harvest’ on Campus

The University of Saskatchewan Ukrainian Students’ Association and The Ukrainian Canadian Students’ Union (SUSK), together with dFilms, hosted a free pre-screening of the feature film “Bitter Harvest” in the auditorium of the Medical Sciences Bldg, March 1, 2017.  Saskatoon was selected as one of four cities across Canada for the screening of this important film. The evening event boasted a turnout of 300 + people. In attendance were Members of the Legislative Assembly. Following the conclusion of the film, Katya Khartova led the audience in the singing of Vichnaya Pamyat (Memory Eternal) in remembrance of the millions of victims of the Holodomor (Death by Hunger) — the Soviet genocide.  The pre-screening provided a tremendous opportunity to bring public awareness to this tragic event in human history.

USUSA Student Research Colloquium

USUSA Student Research Colloquium

On February 15, 2017, the first-ever University of Saskatchewan Ukrainian Students Association (USUSA) research colloquium was held at STM.  The objective of the colloquium was to showcase before a general audience the research being conducted by graduate and undergraduate students studying in the Ukrainian Studies field and/or writing on subjects that pertain to Ukraine. Reflecting student interests, the presentations were on a wide range of topics. Ashley Halko-Addley spoke on the rituals of baptism in the Ukrainian Orthodox Church as a rite of incorporation. Nykole King examined the historical sources for competing ethnic and civic nationalisms in modern Ukraine. Marnie Howlett, an MA candidate in the Dept. of Political Studies, looked at how the idea of a ‘Ukrainian nation’ was reconceptualised as a political community in the wake of the Maidan. Meanwhile, Mitch Dowie, also an MA Political Studies student, discussed Stephen Harper’s foreign policy engagement with Ukraine during the recent conflict using a Neo-classical Realist framework.

Presenter, Marnie Howlet

The evening affair was well-attended by a supportive and enthusiastic crowd of students and community members. Conversation carried over to a reception held in the Atrium. The success of the event suggests that it will be an annual affair. A shining example of the extraordinary energy of the Ukrainian student body on the UofS campus, the colloquium represents not only academic excellence academically but demonstrates strong organizational leadership.

The event was sponsored by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage which provides the USUSA with financial assistance and institutional support.

Presenter, Nykole KIng

Presenter, Ashley Halko-Addley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presenter, Mitch Dowie

20th Anniversary: Dr. Marta Dyczok – 2017 Moyla Lecturer

Professor Marta Dyczok of the University of Western Ontario delivered the 20th annual Mohyla Lecture the title of which was What’s Changed? The Evolution of Ukraine’s Media Since Independence. Author of Ukraine’s Euromaidan: Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016), Dr. Dyczok is a specialist on political developments in the post-Soviet space with special interest in the media.

Prof. Dyczok spoke of the evolving nature of the media landscape in Ukraine, drawing attention to the impact of globalization and the continuing influence of Russia on both the telecommunications and digital platforms. She emphasized the important role of public broadcasting and the politics around the creation of Hromadkse Radio and Hromadske TV. Noting the recent transformation of Ukraine’s state media into a public broadcaster, Prof. Dyczok suggested this was a possible ‘game-changer’ in as much as it might allow for greater accountability and transparency – an important consideration in the context of the hybrid Russo-Ukrainian conflict (which extends to the information sphere) and the wider efforts at democratization.

The 2017 Mohyla Lecture, delivered February 17, 2017, marks the 20th anniversary of the Mohyla Lecture Series. Created at St. Thomas More, it is the premier academic event devoted to Ukrainian Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. This year’s event was co-sponsored by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress – Saskatchewan Provincial Council. The event was organized and hosted by the Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage.

Prof. Khanenko-Friesen Presents at Kharkiv Conference

On December 1-2, Ukrainian Oral History Association (UOHA) hosted in Kharkiv an international Symposium “Oral History in Times of Change: Social Contexts, Political Challenges, Academic Standards”. The conference marked UOHA’s 10th anniversary and was organized at Karazin National University in cooperation with Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage. Dr. Khanenko-Friesen traveled to Kharkiv to deliver a Keynote address “How Oral History Changed the Nation: Truth and Reconciliation in Canada.” The presentation was well received and offered an opportunity for the conference participants to consider various models of national reconciliation in post-conflict societies around the world.

Dr. Khanenko-Friesen offering concluding comments, in partnership with Dr. Oksana Kis, UOHA conference organizer.